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Renée Elise Goldsberry at Sardi's

Victoria Myers interviews Renée Elise Goldsberry
April 26th, 2016

 

VM: Is that particularly true when you’re in something so popular and that’s getting so much attention? Do you have moments of, “Oh god, I have to make sure that people aren’t disappointed”? Does it make it harder to have the mental freedom to relax into it?

REG: I think it doesn’t matter what it is or what people think in terms of how much they love the show. It’s just a truism that something that worked one night live does not work the next night, for me—maybe it happens for other actors. It might just be the fact that I’m trying to create something as opposed to experiencing a moment. I can say something at the exact same time, and if I’m going for a laugh, I’m not going to get it. Or if I’m trying to make myself sad. That’s just not how we work, that’s not how I work. I think the strongest people are really okay with not feeling anything. If I come out, and I don’t feel anything, it’s okay. The words are enough, what’s happening here is enough. What I’m learning is that just because something feels great to do [as an actor], it doesn’t mean it’s any more impactful to the audience. That’s one thing you learn when you’re in a Hamilton. That’s the beauty of being supported by such a strong structure. You have nights where you feel like you’re brilliant and nights where you feel like you were a fraud, and people you respect will be equally as moved because the piece is that strong.

interview